Dignitary protection

The Security Service is in charge of the security of some of the Royal family and of the MPs and government ministers. This dignitary protection is comprised of various elements which enhance security, the ultimate one being the protection provided by a close protection officer (body guard). In its dignitary protection work, the Security Service works closely with the Swedish Police Authority and others.

Dignitary protection work mainly involves preventive efforts which enable protected persons to do their work safely and securely while moving about freely and staying in close contact with the public.

The Service is in charge of the overall design of dignitary protection and of the close protection of the protected person. The Swedish Police is in charge of the remaining security aspects.

Dignitary protection provided for more than 400 positions

The Security Service is in charge of the dignitary protection of the Central Government, which consists of more than 400 positions:

  • The Head of State (the King)
  • The heir to the throne
  • The Speaker
  • The Members of Parliament
  • The Prime Minister
  • The Government Ministers
  • The State Secretaries
  • The State Secretary for Foreign Affairs

The Service is also in charge of the dignitary protection associated with state visits, and similar visits such as when foreign Speakers, Heads of Government and Foreign Ministers visit Sweden.

In certain cases, the Security Service may also decide that personal protection will be provided for other positions, such as for other members of the Royal Family or for foreign ambassadors.

The Swedish Police Authority is in charge of the protection of elected municipal and county representatives.

Protection based on continuous assessments

In any particular case, designing the protection is dependent on continuous assessments made by the Service in relation to the protected person. The Service assesses the criticality of the person's position, the potential threat posed to them, and vulnerabilities. In addition, special assessments are often formed before protected persons take part in particular events.

Together, these assessments provide the basis for the design of the protection, which is adapted to each specific occasion. Based on the assessments, appropriate protective measures are put in place, one of which could be providing a close protection officer to the protected person.

The importance of cooperation

In its dignitary protection work, the Service cooperates closely with the Swedish Police Authority; this applies especially in connection with various events. The Service also cooperates with the security units of the government, the Riksdag and the Royal Court, with embassies in Sweden and with the security services of other countries.